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Canine CPR
Excerpted from the handout from Randa MacMillian, D.V.M's CPR workshop.

DOGS WITH NO HEARTBEAT OR DOGS WITH NO HEARTBEAT OR BREATHING

In the case of certain traumas or diseases, a dog may lose heartbeat and respiration. Causes may include heart disease, seizure, trauma, lung disease, heat stroke, shock, poisoning, any other circumstance that cause the heart to stop. In these causes, the dog may be revived if CPR can be performed immediately. CPR is a technique of last resort when the dog shows no signs of life. If there is any evidence that the dog is breathing, do not perform this technique.

CANINE CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION
A. Place the dog on its side and keep it on its side throughout the procedure.

B. Check for breathing by watching for the dog's chest to rise and fall.

C. If the dog is breathing, proceed no further. Do not use CPR.

D. If the dog is not breathing:
1. Establish an airway by removing any debris from the dog's mouth or by moving the tongue from the back of the throat. Check for breathing by watching the dog's chest rise and fall. If the dog is breathing, stop and do not use CPR.
2. Check for a pulse by placing a hand over the dog's chest just behind the shoulder blade to feel the heartbeat or by placing a hand in the groin area to feel the femoral pulse.

E. If the dog is still not breathing:
1. Cup your hand(s) over the dog's nose and mouth to form a seal. Deliver one breath into the animal every two seconds. If the seal is proper, you should observe the dog's chest rise and fall.
2. If, after you have delivered five breaths, the dog does not show signs of breathing on its own or signs of consciousness and there is no heartbeat, then have a helper place a hand just behind the dog's shoulder blades and apply gentle but firm compressions downward (compressing one-half to one inch for a small dog up to as much as two inches for a large dog) at the rate of one compression every two seconds. If a helper is not available, alternate delivering two breaths and then ten compressions. Do not do any compression if there is a pulse, no matter how faint.
3. Check for a pulse and breathing every two minutes. If there is no pulse and breathing, continue for up to ten minutes before stopping the resuscitation effort.

BREATHING
In the case of certain traumas or diseases, a dog may lose heartbeat and respiration. Causes may include heart disease, seizure, trauma, lung disease, heat stroke, shock, poisoning, any other circumstance that cause the heart to stop. In these causes, the dog may be revived if CPR can be performed immediately. CPR is a technique of last resort when the dog shows no signs of life. If there is any evidence that the dog is breathing, do not perform this technique.

CANINE CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION
A. Place the dog on its side and keep it on its side throughout the procedure.

B. Check for breathing by watching for the dog's chest to rise and fall.

C. If the dog is breathing, proceed no further. Do not use CPR.

D. If the dog is not breathing:
1. Establish an airway by removing any debris from the dog's mouth or by moving the tongue from the back of the throat. Check for breathing by watching the dog's chest rise and fall. If the dog is breathing, stop and do not use CPR.
2. Check for a pulse by placing a hand over the dog's chest just behind the shoulder blade to feel the heartbeat or by placing a hand in the groin area to feel the femoral pulse.

E. If the dog is still not breathing:
1. Cup your hand(s) over the dog's nose and mouth to form a seal. Deliver one breath into the animal every two seconds. If the seal is proper, you should observe the dog's chest rise and fall.
2. If, after you have delivered five breaths, the dog does not show signs of breathing on its own or signs of consciousness and there is no heartbeat, then have a helper place a hand just behind the dog's shoulder blades and apply gentle but firm compressions downward (compressing one-half to one inch for a small dog up to as much as two inches for a large dog) at the rate of one compression every two seconds. If a helper is not available, alternate delivering two breaths and then ten compressions. Do not do any compression if there is a pulse, no matter how faint.
3. Check for a pulse and breathing every two minutes. If there is no pulse and breathing, continue for up to ten minutes before stopping the resuscitation effort.

Credit belongs to: http://hpwtdogmom.org/club/info/caninecpr.html

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